Southern Biscuit Flour Biscuits

Southern Biscuit Flour Biscuits

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by Charlotte Today Staff

WCNC.com

Posted on September 12, 2011 at 8:48 AM

Updated Monday, Sep 12 at 2:31 PM

This is the best biscuit recipe that I make, and I have tried hundreds of variations with more fat, less fat, sugar, extra salt, and even other brands of flour.  I have tried sweet milk, cream, buttermilk, and even 7-up and mayonnaise. This basic recipe is the best, it bakes up light and tender, moist and flaky.

 

I have been an official baker and recipe developer for flour companies for over 15 years and have baked more than thousands of biscuits.  Once I baked and served over 1000 biscuits in 3 hours with food scientist and cookbook author, Shirley Corriher.  So I have baked lots of biscuits and along the way learned a few tricks to make them perfect every time.  They are not magic tricks, but tricks grandmothers learned from their mothers who learned from their mothers before them. 

 

This recipe starts with the first secret, soft wheat southern flour.  biscuit. Northern wheat is hard wheat and thus makes good pizza crust, hard rolls, and bagels.Did you ever think why are biscuits southern?  It is the type of soft wheat that grows best down south that makes a light biscuit

 

Southern Biscuit® Flour is milled by Midstate Mills and the third generation of family millers in Newton, North Carolina, just steps from the town square.  They have been there for over 75 years making southern flour and corn meal, and now biscuit mix, pancake mix and seasoned flour.

 

Flour is the most important ingredient in baking, why not make it the best?

 

 

 

2 cups of Southern Biscuit® Self-Rising Flour

1/4 cup butter, shortening, or lard

2/3 cup whole (not skim) buttermilk

2 tablespoons melted butter

 

Preheat oven to 450° F.

 

Measure flour into bowl.  Stir in sugar if desired. Cut in shortening using a pastry cutter, two knives, or your fingertips until the size of peas.

 

Add the milk and stir until flour is moistened,  Do not overmix.  For a dryer dough, add more flour.  For a wetter dough, add additional milk.

 

Turn the dough onto a lightly floured surface.  Roll to ½-inch thickness.

 

Cut biscuits using a floured 2-inch biscuit cutter.  For softer biscuits, place biscuits on baking sheet so they touch.

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