High school in Rock Hill hears emotional message

High school in Rock Hill hears emotional message

Print
Email
|

by AMY COWMAN / NewsChannel 36 Staff

Bio | Email | Follow: @amywcnc

WCNC.com

Posted on November 9, 2011 at 6:53 PM

Updated Thursday, Nov 10 at 12:14 PM

ROCK HILL, S.C. -- Starting a chain reaction of kindness and being nice to everyone no matter who they are or what they look like—that's the message behind Rachel's Challenge.

NewsChannel 36 is proud to partner with the group named for the first victim of the Columbine High School shooting in 1999.

On Wednesday the challenge came to Northwestern High School in Rock Hill.
 
Junior Zakiya Parkinson didn't just watch the Rachel's Challenge presentation.  As she got choked up talking to us, it’s easy to see the words and actions of Rachel Scott really touched her heart.

"It really, really changed me.  It did," said Parkinson.  "It really meant a lot to me. I actually cried, because I don't really like to talk to people really, but after this I think I should start being kind to everybody.”
 
Rachel’s story started a chain reaction at Northwestern High School, opening many students’ eyes to the hurt they've caused others.
 
Rachel's father, Darrell Scott happened to be in town and stopped by to hear the presentation at Northwestern.

"The video really made me understand where they're coming from, how they feel.  Everyone has different emotions,” Scott said.  "She wrote on her dresser that her hands would touch the hearts of millions of people and I'm not sure she would even be able to believe how big the impact has become.”
 
And it continues to grow.  These 70 students at Northwestern are committing to carrying out the message by training for the first Friends of Rachel group at their school.
 
"I want to pass it on.  I want other people to get the chain reaction to make people want to help others and bring them into their group," said Friends of Rachel member Russell Hubbs.
 
They plan on organizing regular events where they send kind messages to school staff and create chains of kindness to make their school a more welcoming, bully free place.
 
"Since there's going to be a group of us, we're all going to help each other out and keep each other inspired by it," said Friends of Rachel member Ivy Mushka.

Although it's a non-profit, there are still costs to have the program. The Harrelson family of Harrelson Nissan in Rock Hill sponsored bringing Rachel's Challenge to the school.
 
 

Print
Email
|