Local programs take hit with government shutdown

Local programs take hit with government shutdown

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by TONY BURBECK / NBC Charlotte

Bio | Email | Follow: @TonyWCNC

WCNC.com

Posted on October 1, 2013 at 6:28 PM

Updated Tuesday, Oct 1 at 6:28 PM

CHARLOTTE, N.C. -- Thousands of people all over the state and nation showed up for work Tuesday, only to be told they've been furloughed due to the federal government shutdown. The change puts their professional futures and paychecks in limbo.

That includes approximately 250 members of the 145th Airlift Wing of the North Carolina National Guard, who were furloughed Tuesday.

Car after car pulled out of the parking around 11 a.m. after members were notified. Some were clearly upset and frustrated.  One said his NCANG paycheck pays his mortgage and monthly child support. Without it, he isn't sure how he will make ends meet.

Bill Stamoulis makes his living feeding National Guard members at Mr. G's Restaurant.  He says there will be a ripple effect.  No paychecks plus uncertain job status equals patrons holding on to every last dollar.

"They just put a screwdriver in the whole machine. It messes it up. It basically derails their whole financial situation and they're left empty handed because of some political upheaval in Washington," Stamoulis said.

The hope is the shutdown ends soon and comes with retroactive pay to cover any lost time.
 
Eight Head Start programs in York and surrounding counties could close Monday due to the government shutdown.  The program was supposed to receive millions in federal dollars Tuesday as the beginning of their fiscal year.  Now, approximately 120 employees might not receive checks and nearly 900 kids who take part in the early childhood education program would have to find other places to go.

"What the parents are going to have to do, and a lot of them work, is going to have to find some kind of alternate child development place to put their kids starting Monday," said Walter Kellogg, Executive Director of Carolina Community Actions, Inc.

Late Tuesday the State of South Carolina said the Women, Infant and Child program known as WIC is considered non-essential and will not get money from the federal government due to the shutdown.  For now there is still money in the program, but the state says disbursements could be affected starting October 15 if this isn't resolved.

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