Rescue teams recover body of second drowning victim

Rescue teams recover body of second drowning victim

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by WCNC.com Staff

WCNC.com

Posted on July 28, 2013 at 1:16 PM

Updated Sunday, Jul 28 at 3:53 PM

CALDWELL COUNTY, N.C. – Crews in Caldwell County have recovered the body of a swimmer who went missing in Wilson's Creek on Saturday evening-- the same creek where a 10-year-old girl died on Saturday.

More than 60 emergency, fire, forestry and rescue personnel worked to search a 10-mile stretch of Wilson's Creek, by both foot and water, for 48-year-old Juan Alberdi, of Huntersville, who went missing around 6:15 Saturday night.

The waters had receded, and were clearer than they were Saturday night, aiding rescue workers, many of whom worked late into the night, in their search.

Alberdi's body was found about a quarter-mile from where authorities were told the man entered the water.

The body of 10-year-old Delilah Lovett, of Charlotte, who, along with the man, went swimming in the area of Wilson’s Creek known as the “bathtub”, was recovered by kayakers Saturday evening.

Authorities say Alberdi and Delilah, who were both visiting Wilson’s Creek with their families,  were swept away in the strong currents while swimming in the swollen waters near what is known as the "Lady on the Rock". Alberdi and Delilah were members of two different families visiting the area.

Alberdi's wife told NBC Charlotte he drowned trying to save Delilah. She continued that their 11-year-old twins witnessed the entire thing.

Caldwell County Emergency Services have asked the public to stay away from Wilson’s Creek, Brown Mountain Beach and Playmore Beach on Sunday to allow authorities to conduct their search.

A command post was set up at the Collettsville Fire Department.

Officials shut down a five-mile stretch of Wilson Creek Road from Adako Road during the search, but the roadway has since reopened.

With four inches of rain having fallen in the area since Friday night, Wilson's Creek remained about two feet above normal levels with very swift currents.

Authorities say their biggest challenge was the gorge wilderness terrain with slick, rocky river banks and heavy brush.

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