Gastonia neighborhood wants its cul de sac fixed--but who's responsible?

Gastonia neighborhood wants its cul de sac fixed--but who's responsible?

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by TONY BURBECK / NBC Charlotte

Bio | Email | Follow: @TonyWCNC

WCNC.com

Posted on October 25, 2012 at 2:16 PM

Updated Saturday, Oct 12 at 12:20 AM

GASTONIA, N.C. -- People who live on Lampglow Court in Gastonia want to know why they were left out when other roads and cul-de-sacs in the Country Meadows neighborhood were paved, but theirs wasn’t.

The repaving happened about a month ago, but Lampglow Court is still a mess, neighbors say.

"There's potholes everywhere, the gravel is totally uneven. It depreciates our home values, it's really an eyesore, it's really disappointing,” said a homeowner named Carrie.  She did not want to use her last name.

Ten neighborhood kids who live on the cul-de-sac often play in the cul-de-sac.  There is a basketball hoop there and chalk marks on the ground.

Country Meadow Drive, the main drag through the neighborhood and the road from which you turn onto Lampglow Court is nice and smooth.  Pave marks are still noticeable in the new asphalt.

"This is exactly what we wanted, it's smooth, it looks good, it's going to hold up in the rain,” Carrie said.

Carrie says paving crews parked in her cul-de-sac but never did put down asphalt.

Call it asphalt envy.

"It does feel like the rest of the neighborhood was good enough to get this, but ya’ll are just off to the side, so we're not doing to deal with you,” said Carrie, referring to how neighbors who live on the cul-de-sac feel.

We checked and found Lampglow Court isn't a city street. It isn’t a county street and it doesn’t even show up in the NCDOT’s database, let alone as a state-maintained road like Country Meadow and other roads in the neighborhood which are state-maintained and were re-paved.

County development officials say it appears Lampglow Court was never handed over to the state because it didn't meet state standards.  In general, those standards involve size, lots, curbing, damage and drainage.

Officials say in that case, upkeep falls to the developer or the people who live there. The county plot doesn't list a developer's name, so it appears the money for resolving asphalt envy would have to come out of neighbors' pockets.

"We would take up money and have fundraisers.  We would do everything we could to make sure it was paved because we see what it can be now and we see what we have, so I know we could try to do something,” Carrie said.

Officials say neighbors could make enough repairs to Lampglow Court to bring it up to state standards, then petition the state to take it over.

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