Blind curves are a danger on Charlotte greenways

Blind curves are a danger on Charlotte greenways

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by BILL MCGINTY / NBC Charlotte

Bio | Email | Follow: @billwcnc

WCNC.com

Posted on September 6, 2013 at 1:21 AM

Updated Friday, Sep 6 at 1:40 AM

CHARLOTTE, N.C. -- Tens of thousands of people use Mecklenburg County’s Greenway system to walk, run and bike.

Kevin Williams loves the Greenway. In fact, he’s on it biking four times a week and even volunteers to help keep it clean and safe. But the latter has proven to be a bit more difficult and dangerous.

“I tried to swerve out of the way, but he ran right into my leg,” says Williams, as he describes the day he was hit by another biker as he shielded an older man walking his dog.

The accident happened west of the Elm Lane Bridge on the Four Mile Greenway.

“And and he was going so fast, he didn’t have time to turn out of the way. And his peddle actually ripped my leg wide open to the point that when I went to the hospital. It was so deep, doctors couldn’t even staple or stitch it,” remembers Williams.

The horseshoe bend under the bridge on Four Mile has not one, but two blind curves -- one on either side. Walker Ron Wilson had a close call too, and says “it was at the last second. I had to jump off the greenway up on the concrete, so it’s dangerous.”

Christine Benhem pushes her new baby boy here there or four days a week and says of the curves, “I don’t want someone to come around the corner and hit me and my baby.”

So what’s the fix?  Some of the ideas being floated include mirrors mounted up there that would allow walkers to see traffic in both directions.

The other idea is signage, warning people that there are blind curves ahead. Mecklenburg County Parks and Recreation tells NBC Charlotte they are looking into signage, but it’s costly and funding is an issue right now. However, the County did commit to putting up two signs in this area of the Four Mile to prevent more accidents.

The County will meet with concerned neighbors and decide on the look and placement of the “blind curve” signs.

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