Halloween survival tips for parents

Reasons Kids Don't Go Trick-or-Treating

3 Reasons Kids Don’t Go Trick-Or-Treating

With Halloween around the corner, many kids are excited about going house to house getting tons of candy. But not all kids feel this way. There are some who don’t want to go trick-or-treating. It's something that can be difficult to understand. 

Fear is the most common reason some kids won’t go trick-or-treating. It’s dark outside. It’s the unknown of seeing many different costumes, but not knowing whose inside those costumes. Remember Halloween has a theme of fear with witches, ghosts, goblins. Scary movies – yelling, screaming, which be an overload for some kids.

Older kids tend to think it’s funny to scare the younger ones. Sneaking up, yelling at, tugging on their Halloween bags can make trick or treating unpredictable.

Costumes can contribute to the fear factor. There are various creepy costumes with fake blood, missing teeth, weapons and missing body parts; you name it, kids see it. The recent clown pranks have many kids scared of clown costumes.

3 Ways To Help Your Kid’s Fear of Halloween

Halloween can be scary for some kids. Some kids don't want to go trick or treating. Here are 3 tips to help your kids enjoy Halloween.

1. If they're scared of shadows, use a bright flashlight to shine on the shadows, which will magically disappear. Many times it’s the unknown that makes kids scared. 

2. If they're scared of getting scared while trick-or-treating, walk near your kids. Sometimes your physical presence is all they need. When you walk along with your child they'll feel more secure. Even though you can see them from the street or driveway, they can't see you when they're walking towards the house and away from you. 

3. If you, as the parent, want to scale back trick-or-treating to limit what your kids see on Halloween night then change locations. Take your kids trick-or-treating at malls, churches or fall festivals where the scare factor will be limited. Or, if you want to stay in your neighborhood, visit houses that have minimal scary Halloween decorations and music. 



Tweens and Halloween

Halloween is a lot of fun time for kids. As they get older, you might be thinking how old is too old to go trick-or-treating. Some people say once kids reach the teen age years and others think that you're never too old to trick-or-treat. Many teens will phase out of trick-or-treating because they think it's only for young kids. 

If your tween or teen decides to go trick-or-treating then they should wear costumes. Putting on a mask while wearing their everyday clothes goes against the spirit of Halloween. Having said this, if a teen who isn't wearing a costume comes to your door, still give them candy. You don't know the reason they aren't dressed up. 

For those teens who aren't interested in trick-or-treating, but want to enjoy Halloween, have a Halloween or costume party. They can take their younger siblings trick-or-treating. Or, they can pass out the candy to the costumed visitors. Also, they could go to a haunted house. There are many different ways to celebrate Halloween. 



Teens And Scandalous Costumes

Halloween is a fun time for kids. You'll see their creativity when they select costumes. Sometimes the girls pick costumes that are too revealing. As a parent, you might be wondering what to do. 

In my opinion, girls emulate what they see splashed across TV screens, internet and magazine covers. They learn at early ages that showing skin sells and attracts attention. Now, it’s not respectful attention, but it’s attention.

Let's say your daughter wants to wear a barely there costume, how do you handle? Depending on their age and developmental level, have a candid chat about the impressions of their costume choice. Someone’s perception of you becomes their reality of you even if it isn’t truth. People judge based on superficial characteristics. As their parents come up with alternative costume options. Remember you can say, "no". 

Some girls might say, “It’s not like I dress like this everyday, what’s the big deal?” Yes, they might not dress this way daily, but the internet and social media will remember through posted photos.

Share your thoughts with me on Twitter at @blancacobb. Remember to use the hash tag #BlancaOn2. Or, you can find me on my facebook page.

Blanca Cobb is a WFMY News 2 Contributing Editor, body language expert and keynote speaker/trainer who covers nonverbal communication, psychology and behavior. Follow her @blancacobb. The opinions expressed in this article are exclusively hers.

(© 2016 WFMY)


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