Eaglet prepares to move to hack tower

Eaglet prepares to move to hack tower

Credit: WCNC.com

The eaglet at the Carolina Raptor Center is now almost six weeks and will soon move to the hack tower. The curious eaglet moved to the lower level of the nest Thursday, March 29 and is content just hanging out in the new location.

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by NewsChannel 36 Staff

WCNC.com

Posted on January 2, 2013 at 8:57 PM

HUNTERSVILLE, N.C. -- An eaglet born at the Carolina Raptor Center about six weeks ago will move to a tower Monday to learn how to live on its own.


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The eaglet will stay in the "hack tower" until it's about 12 weeks old. At that time, it will be released.
Workers at the raptor center will take the eaglet from the nest Monday morning. They will perform a medical checkup, take a DNA sample to determine the eaglet's sex, and then transfer the eaglet to the hack tower.

 

The eaglet has been hanging out in the lower level of the nest box at the raptor center for about a week now.  The eaglet seems content in the new location and continues to eat.

The eaglet was born to parents Savannah and Derek in late February. The second egg in the nest never hatched.  

While in the hack tower, staffers with the raptor center will feed the eaglet once a day while it gets accustomed to the new environment. The eaglet will spend time flapping its wings to build up flight muscles. At about 12 weeks, the doors to the hack tower will open so that the eaglet can fly away.

Right now, the raptor center does not plan to place a tracking device on the eaglet.

The history of eagle nesting at Carolina Raptor Center began in 2006, when Savannah and Derek laid and hatched two eggs, resulting in the release of eagles Len and Lola into the wild. Since that time, Letha (2007), Noah (2010) and Kinsey (2011) have been released back into their natural habitat. Tracking information still is available from Len, who has traveled up and down the East Coast and into Canada, and his sister, Lola, who appears to have nested in a large eagle colony in Alabama.
 

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