Mecklenburg 1 of 8 counties to vote against Amendment One

Mecklenburg County was one of eight counties to vote against the Marriage Amendment during Tuesday's primary elections.

CHARLOTTE, N.C. -- Mecklenburg County was one of just eight counties to vote against the Marriage Amendment during Tuesday's primary elections.

Mecklenburg County had 92,503 people vote against Amendment One, resulting in 54 percent of the vote, according to theNorth Carolina State Board of Elections


Buncombe (Asheville), Chatham, Dare (Outer Banks), Durham (Durham), Mecklenburg (Charlotte), Oranage (Chapel Hill), Wake (Raleigh) and Watauga (Boone) counties all voted against Amendment One as well.
Wake County had the most votes against Amendment One with 139,020. A total of 105,900 people voted for the Marriage Amendment in Wake County,according to theNorth Carolina State Board of Elections.
North Carolina is made up of 100 counties and 1.3 million people voted for the Marriage Amendment in North Carolina. Overall, 832,867 voted against the amendment, according to theNorth Carolina State Board of Elections
Here's county-by-county results of the Amendment One vote: Click here. Green means a county voted for Amendment One.
NC marriage amendment foes consider legal options

RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) -- Groups opposed to the constitutional amendment in North Carolina that defines marriage solely as a union between a man and a woman say they haven't decided whether to pursue legal action.

They held a news conference Wednesday, the day after voters overwhelmingly approved the amendment, which says a marriage between one man and one woman is the only domestic legal union that's valid or recognized in North Carolina.

The executive director of the state chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union says the words domestic legal union have no definition in law. She says attorneys must determine what that phrase means before they decide whether to litigate over the amendment.

Stuart Campbell of Equality NC says opponents are discussing how to challenge the amendment, which he called broad and vague.


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