Toddler killed after recalled IKEA dresser crushes him

A California toddler was recently killed after an IKEA dresser that was recalled over a year ago toppled over and crushed him.

Two-year-old Jozef Dudek died in May after his father put him down for a nap and returned to find his son beneath a Malm dresser from IKEA, according to a statement from the family's lawyers.  Jozef is the eighth child to die by an unsecured IKEA dresser, according to the Philadelphia Enquirer, which has extensively followed the cases. According to the Enquirer, he is the first child to die since IKEA issued a massive recall for chests and dressers, which can tip over and crush children if they aren't anchored to the wall. 

In 2015, after two children were crushed by IKEA drawer sets the previous year, the company recalled the dressers, which can tip over and crush children if they are not anchored to the wall. The company reiterated its safety warnings in April 2016 after a third child died.

For those who currently own a Malm dresser, the product can be returned for a refund, according to a Consumer Product Safety Commission release on the recall. Those who choose to keep the dresser can request that IKEA install a free wall anchoring kit, or they can install it on their own.

According to a statement from the one of the family's lawyers, Alan M. Feldman of Philadelphia's Feldman Shepherd lawfim, the recall was "poorly publicized by IKEA and ineffective in getting these defective and unstable dressers out of children's bedrooms."

"It's terrifying that there are millions more of these dressers in homes across the country, which may cause more harm and anguish in the future," he said in a statement.

A child is killed every two weeks by furniture or appliances that fall on him or her, according to the Consumer Product Safety Commission, which is investigating Jozef's death, NPR reported.

"IKEA urges all consumers to securely attach chests to the wall with the hardware included in every IKEA chest of drawers package," the company said in a statement, NPR reported. "Wall attachment is a necessary part of the assembly instructions, which must not be overlooked. If it is impossible for units to be attached to the wall, consumers should choose a different storage solution."

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