What's on your North Carolina ballot (besides Clinton and Trump)

As with every presidential election, the Republican and Democratic candidate dominate the news cycle. 

It's easy for Americans to turn on the television or check the internet to know where Trump or Clinton will be that day and what they'll be discussing. But what about the other pages of our ballot? 

While the Commander-in-Chief is regarded as the most powerful person in the world, other political candidates and referendums may have more of a direct impact on the daily lives of North Carolinians.

We have put together an overview of what will be on a North Carolinian's ballot, as well as candidates, propositions and linked references specific to the Tar Heel state and Charlotte.

To check where you can cast your ballot on Election Day, click here.

If you need to check your voter registration to see if you are registered to vote, click here.

 

 

Note: Click on a candidate's name to access their website for more information.

Statewide Candidates:

U.S. Congress

Senate:

- Richard Burr (R)

- Deborah K. Ross (D)

- Sean Haugh (L)

U.S. House of Representatives

North Carolina will elect 13 candidates to serve in the United States House, one from each of the Tar Heel state's 13 congressional districts. 

North Carolina's 12th Congressional District is located in the west-central portion of the state and includes portions of Cabarrus, Davidson, Forsynth, Guilford, Mecklenburg and Rowan counties.

District 12 Candidates:

- Leon Threatt (R)

- Alma Adams (D) - Incumbent

As a result of a recent litigation, the congressional districts in North Carolina have changed. Look at your voter registration card or consult your local election office to find out which district you're voting in. 

To find your current U.S. House of Representative, visit the United States House of Representatives website and enter your zip code. For a list of candidates, click here.

 

North Carolina Governor

- Pat McCrory (R) - Incumbent

- Roy Cooper (D)

- Lon Cecil (L)

 

North Carolina Lieutenant Governor

- Dan Forest (R)

- Linda Coleman (D)

- Jacki Cole (L)

 

North Carolina Attorney General

- Buck Newton (R)

- Josh Stein (D)

 

North Carolina Auditor

- Chuck Stuber (R)

- Beth A. Wood (D)

 

North Carolina Commissioner of Agriculture

- Steve Troxler (R)

- Walter Smith (D)

 

North Carolina Commissioner of Insurance

- Mike Causey (R)

- Wayne Goodwin (D)

 

North Carolina Commissioner of Labor

- Cherie Berry (R)

- Charles Meeker (D)

 

North Carolina Secretary of State

- Michael LaPaglia (R)

- Elaine Marshall (D)

 

North Carolina Superintendent of Public Instruction

- Mark Johnson (R)

- June Atkinson (D)

 

North Carolina Treasurer

- Dale R. Folwell (R)

- Dan Blue III (D)

 

North Carolina State Senate

Representation in North Carolina State's House and Senate is determined by each district. Between all of North Carolina's districts, 88 candidates are running for state senate. 

Wondering which district you're in? The North Carolina General Assembly's website has an interactive map for users to type in their address and find their district. 

From there you can click here to see which candidates are running for your district.

According to the North Carolina General Assembly, the Charlotte area has five different districts for state senate.

The state senate candidates that will be on your ballot depend on where you're living and voting. Here's the districts and candidates that are running within the Charlotte area.

North Carolina State Senate - District 37

- Bob Diamond (R)

- Jeff Jackson (D) - Incumbent

North Carolina State Senate - District 38

- Joel Ford (D) - Incumbent

- Richard Rivette (R)

North Carolina State Senate - District 39

- James Daniel Bishop (or Dan Bishop) (R)

- Lloyd Scher (D)

North Carolina State Senate - District 40

- Joyce Waddell (D) - Incumbent

- Marguerite Cooke (R)

North Carolina State Senate - District 41

- Jonathan Hudson (D)

- Jeff Tarte (R) - Incumbent

 

North Carolina State House of Representatives

Wondering which district you're in? The North Carolina General Assembly's website has an interactive map for users to type in their address and find their district. 

From there you can click here to see which candidates are running for your district.

The candidates for the House of Representatives on your ballot depend on where you're living and voting. Here's the districts and candidates that are running within the Charlotte area.

North Carolina House of Representatives - District 88

- Mary Belk (D)

- Rob Bryan (R)

North Carolina House of Representatives - District 92

- Beth Danae Caulfield (R)

- Chaz Beasley (D)

North Carolina House of Representatives - District 99

- Rodney W. Moore (D)

North Carolina House of Representatives - District 100

- John Autrey (D)

North Carolina House of Representatives - District 101

- Beverly Miller Earle (D)

- Justin Dunn (R)

North Carolina House of Representatives - District 102

- Becky Carney (D)

North Carolina House of Representatives - District 103

- William (Bill) Brawley (R)

- Rochelle Rivas (D)

North Carolina House of Representatives - District 104

- Andy Dulin (R)

- Peter Noris (D)

North Carolina House of Representatives - District 105

- Connie Green-Johnson (D)

- Scott Stone (R)

North Carolina House of Representatives - District 106

- Carla Cunningham (D)

North Carolina House of Representatives - District 107

- Kelly Alexander (D)

 

Non-Partisan Offices

North Carolina Supreme Court Associate Justice

- Michael R. (Mike) Morgan

- Robert H. (Bob) Edmunds

 

North Carolina Court of Appeals Judge (Stephens Seat)

- Phil Berger, Jr. (R)

- Linda Stephens (D)

 

North Carolina Court of Appeals Judge (Geer Seat)

- Hunter Murphy (R)

- Margaret Eagles (D)

- Donald Ray Buie (Unaffiliated)

 

North Carolina Court of Appeals Judge (Hunter Seat)

- Bob Hunter

- Abe Jones

 

North Carolina Court of Appeals Judge (Dietz Seat)

- Richard Dietz

- Vince Rozier

 

North Carolina Court of Appeals Judge (Zachary Seat)

- Valerie Zachary

- Rickye McKoy-Mitchell

 

North Carolina District Courts

The United States district courts are the general trial courts of the United Stated federal court system. 

Like the North Carolina Superior Courts, there is a district court in each county. Each federal judicial district has at least one courthouse, and many districts have more than one. Within North Carolina, there are well over 20 district courts. Here's a map of the 2016 North Carolina superior court divisions and judicial districts, courtesy of Ballotpedia

For a list of North Carolina District Court Judges and Attorneys up for election, click here.

 

Specific to Mecklenburg County:

Mecklenburg County Commissioner at Large

*You may vote for three

- Jeremy Brasch (R)

- Patricia (Pat) Cotham (D)

- Trevor M. Fuller (D)

- Ella Scarborough (D)

 

Mecklenburg County Commissioner Candidates

Mecklenburg County Commissioner - District 1

- Jim Puckett

Mecklenburg County Commissioner - District 2

- Vilma D. Leake

Mecklenburg County Commissioner - District 3

- George Dunlap

Mecklenburg County Commissioner - District 4

- Dumont Clarke (D)

Mecklenburg County Commissioner - District 5

- Marc Friedland

- Matthew Ridenhour

Mecklenburg County Commissioner - District 6

- Bill James

 

Register of Deeds

- Fred Smith (D)

 

Soil and Water Conservation District Supervisor

- Brad Johnson

- Doug Hanks

- Eric Erickson

- Lisa Carol Rudisill

- Vonnie Brown

For a complete list of North Carolina candidates, including candidates by district, visit the North Carolina State Board of Elections' website or click here

Referenda - Bonds (Mecklenburg County)

What are bonds? A bond is (very simply) a loan. In an election, a bond is part of a ballot measure where voters can either approve or deny city spending. 

The city of Charlotte pays for bonds over a longer period of time using funds from property tax, sales taxes and city fees similar to a home mortgage. According to the city of Charlotte's website, bonds in the Queen City are a "low-investment" because Charlotte's credit ranking is "AAA, the highest ranking a city can receive from national rating agencies."

The bonds on the 2016 ballot are actually the second round of proposed bonds in a long-term plan. City leaders came together in 2013 to create the City of Charlotte's Community Investment Plan. This year's bonds on the ballot focus on transportation, housing and neighborhood improvement. 

City of Charlotte Transportation Bonds: Vote Yes or No

"Shall the order authorizing $148,440,000 of bonds plus interest to provide funds to pay the capital costs of constructing, reconstructing, enlarging, extending and improving certain streets, including streets and roads constituting a part of the State highway system or otherwise the responsibility of the State and including the cost of related studies, streetscape and pedestrian improvements, relocation of utilities, plans and design; acquiring, constructing, reconstructing, widening, extending, paving, resurfacing, grading or improving streets, roads, intersections, parking lots and pedestrian and bicycle paths; acquiring, constructing, reconstructing or improving sidewalks, curbs, gutters, drains, bridges, overpasses, underpasses and grade crossing and providing related landscaping, lighting and traffic controls, signals and markers; and the acquisition of land and rights-of-way in land required therefor, and providing that additional taxes may be levied in an amount sufficient to pay the principal of and interest on the bonds be approved?"

In other words: Nearly $150 million will fund street improvement, sidewalk restoration and improvement, road improvement like paving run down roads, etc. According to Charlotte Five, some of the bonds funds will go toward the completion of the Cross Charlotte Trail, Monroe Road streetscape and Northeast Corridor Infrastructure.

City of Charlotte Housing Bonds: Vote Yes or No

"Shall the order authorizing $15,000,000 of bonds plus interest to provide funds to pay the capital costs of acquiring, constructing, developing, equipping and furnishing housing projects for the benefit of persons of low income, or moderate income, or low and moderate income, including without limitation loans, grants, interest supplements and other programs of financial assistance to persons of low income, or moderate income, or low and moderate income, and developers of housing for persons of low income, or moderate income, or low and moderate income, and construction of infrastructure improvements related thereto and the acquisition of land and rights-of-way required therefor, and providing that additional taxes may be levied in an amount sufficient to pay the principal of and interest on the bonds be approved?"

In other words: $15 million will go into Charlotte's Housing Diversity Program which is designed to create mixed-income communities by focusing on six programs.

These include a focus on supporting new housing, developers constructing housing for low-income households, the prevention of homelessness, the development of affordable housing, assisting non-profit developers and 'blighted' single family homes to acquire homes and renovating homes in areas in town that have high vacancy.

City of Charlotte Neighborhood Improvement Bonds: Vote Yes or No

"Shall the order of authorizing $55,000,000 of bonds plus interest to provide funds to pay the capital costs of infrastructure improvements for various neighborhoods of the City, including the cost of related studies, plans and design, acquiring, constructing, reconstructing, improving, installing or providing curbs, gutters, storm drainage, sidewalks, pedestrian and bicycle paths; paving, resurfacing, grading or improving streets, roads and intersections, providing public open space, landscaping and lighting, and acquiring any necessary equipment, land, interest in land and rights-of-way therefor, and providing that additional taxes may be levied in an amount sufficient to pay the principal of and interest on the bonds be approved?"

In other words: $55 million to improve infrastructure and connection throughout Charlotte neighborhoods. According to the city of Charlotte's website, one example of what the money would be put towards is a way for pedestrians and bicycle cross walk across the light rail to access the Publix development along with other retailers in the area. The cross walk would be roughly midway between the two existing light rail stations of New Bern Station and East/West Station.

If there is anything you see that needs to be added to the story, email ajudson@wcnc.com or tweet @andiejudsonnews.

Copyright 2016 WCNC


JOIN THE CONVERSATION

To find out more about Facebook commenting please read the
Conversation Guidelines and FAQs

Leave a Comment