Former Panthers' announcer takes unique approach to calling golf

Former Panthers' announcer takes unique approach to calling golf

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by IRA CRONIN / NBC Charlotte

Bio | Email | Follow: @IraWCNC

WCNC.com

Posted on May 3, 2013 at 5:47 AM

Updated Friday, May 3 at 6:20 AM

CHARLOTTE, N.C. – If you have watched any golf on television, you know that announcers who are tasked with giving viewers the details of the game have a very special, very quiet delivery, especially when they are standing just steps away from the golfers on the course.

It is a much different kind of approach than we are used to hearing on Sundays in the fall, when professional football announcers react with excitement and volume after big plays.

So imagine what it was like for Bill Rosinksi when he stepped out of Panthers’ stadium, and onto the cool green grass of a golf course to describe golf to radio listeners.

Rosinski, you may recall, was the voice of the Panthers from 1994 to 2004.  Now, he’s back in the business he started in, and this week he's working for PGA Tour Radio, on Sirius.

“Well it’s interesting because normally for college football or basketball you can use great inflection throughout the course of the play, here you are trying to get into a position to call golfer shot, one without him hearing you which can be an issue sometimes out here, and two so you can see what's going on," Rosinski said.
 
Rosinski recently talked about the transition with NBC Charlotte.  He says there have been situations in the past where he has been a little too loud near the green and caused a player to back off of his shot.  Now he says he has a better feel for where to stand so that he can speak during a player’s shot without being heard.

"Positioning out here is really important and I've been doing this like five years now and I think once you get the hang of it you know how to keep your voice at a low level and then once it's the shot then hey it’s just like a touchdown, like Steve Smith going against Rams for a score, and Thursday is different than Sunday. On Thursday a birdie is nice, and birdie on Sunday on the back nine is really good, so you kind of pace yourself throughout the week," he said.

He also says there is a method behind those ‘hushed tones’ that goes far beyond simply whispering.  In fact, Rosinski says, golf announcers are told not to whisper, but to speak in a ‘low drone.’

“We are told not to whisper, I would call it a low drone, because if your whispering no one is going to hear you, people have to understand what you’re saying, so it’s a low drone, and then your voice rises when they hit the shot," Rosinski said.  "So the whisper is no good but the golf low drone is excellent.”

NBC Charlotte coverage of the Wells Fargo Championship continues throughout the entire tournament, through Sunday, May 5.

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