Statesville house riddled with crime to be torn down

Statesville house riddled with crime to be torn down

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by TONY BURBECK / NBC Charlotte

Bio | Email | Follow: @TonyWCNC

WCNC.com

Posted on October 30, 2012 at 6:08 PM

Updated Friday, Oct 25 at 4:57 AM

STATESVILLE, N.C. -- A Statesville house declared a nuisance due to years of crime and violence will be torn down this week, and the homeowner has to pay for the demolition.

Neighbors say the people living in the house at 141 Troutman Shoals Road have been terrorizing them for years and it got to the point where enough was enough.

There have been at least 130 calls to the home over the last decade, according to Captain Darren Campbell with the Iredell County Sheriff’s Office.

The list of problems coming from the house is extensive and covers everything from repeated drug deals, drive by shootings, threats, vandalism and fights, neighbors say.

"Fight calls, man down calls, drugs, stolen property, assaults, gunshots. It's been a constant pain in the neighbors' side out there,” Captain Campbell said.

As a result, the sheriff’s office, ALE and the district attorney’s office pursued a nuisance abatement order as a permanent solution.  A judge signed the order last week. Now the family has to move out and demolition is scheduled to begin Thursday.

The woman who owns the house, Deborah Goforth, is in prison for selling drugs.  Investigators say Goforth’s children kept living in the house and kept causing problems.

Neighbors say they're tired of the threats, the swearing and people pulling up all hours of the night and staying for a couple minutes, drive-through-window style. They didn't want to talk on camera for fear of retaliation.

It’s a way of life down a dirt road they hope ends when their neighbors are gone.

"It's a good neighborhood and we were able to come help the people who live out there and hopefully they'll be able to enjoy it a lot more now,” Campbell said.

Authorities are making Goforth pay the demolition bill. If she doesn’t, the cost will default to the county, Campbell said.

The property must remain vacant for at least a year.

Watching people pack up Tuesday was enough for one neighbor to take the day off just so he could watch and enjoy the satisfaction.

Campbell says this move should put others on notice they'll do the same thing to remedy other ongoing problems.

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