Temperature can be determined by cricket's chirp

Temperature can be determined by cricket's chirp

Temperature can be determined by cricket's chirp

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by JOHN WENDEL / NBC Charlotte

WCNC.com

Posted on August 10, 2013 at 1:52 PM

Updated Saturday, Aug 10 at 2:04 PM

Lately, I have been seeing more and more crickets inside the building at work and sometimes I wonder if you can hear them chirping on the air. The chirping sound that a male cricket makes is due to a hard ridge on its back rubbing a part of its wing.  The sound is used to scare or warn predators, but also to attract a mate.  In 1897 A.E. Dolbear, a professor at Tuft University, studied the cricket and discovered you can calculate the temperature by counting the number of chirps it makes.  He even developed an equation to relate the chirps and temperature.
                                                                               

T = 50((N-40)/4)
 

“T” is the temperature in degrees Fahrenheit and “N” is the number of chirps per minute.  This equation works for the most common Field Cricket, and there are different equations for other types of crickets.
 

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