Another gloomy day in the Carolinas as Cindy makes landfall

Chief Meteorologist Brad Panovich provides an update on Tropical Storm Cindy and its potential impact on the Carolinas.

CHARLOTTE, N.C. – Now that Tropical Storm Cindy has made landfall, Chief Meteorologist Brad Panovich is keeping an eye on what the Carolinas can expect in terms of rainfall.

Cindy officially made landfall sometime after 2 a.m. in southwestern Louisiana, bringing sustained wind speeds of around 40 mph, as well as heavy rain and the threat of tornadoes. Panovich was quick to point out during his Thursday VLOG that the storm was never really a strong wind threat.

“We’ve seen a couple of gusts around 70 mph, but this hasn’t really been about the wind,” Panovich said. “This has been about water and there is a ton of moisture coming inland.”

A huge plume of moisture is currently drenching the southeast, with a number of areas being susceptible to flash flooding, which has already been seen, and tornadoes. With Charlotte sitting just on the edge of the moisture, the Queen City could see some showers Thursday afternoon and evening, but Panovich doesn’t expect anything heavy until a band makes its way through Thursday night.

“This will be the one rain band that I think we’ll have to watch for potential flooding,” he said.  

Friday is looking like a decent day for Charlotte. While what’s left of Cindy begins to merge with a cold front in Tennessee, the Carolinas should experience some sunshine with classic summer temperatures.

“Tomorrow (Friday) is looking pretty nice,” Panovich said. “We could see temperatures in the low 90s with some sunshine. Not a bad day.”

By the time the front reaches Charlotte late Friday or early Saturday, it won’t be long before we start drying out, Panovich said.

“The heaviest moisture will be in and out pretty quickly Saturday,” he said. “We could have a bout of heavy rain early, maybe even a scattered storm late, but then things start to move out.”

The heaviest rain for our area is expected in the mountains, where up to three inches could fall with this system. The biggest threat of flooding will likely be west of the Carolinas in Tennessee and Kentucky.

© 2017 WCNC.COM


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