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First-ever 'National Black Voter Day' to motivate and galvanize black voters

BET in partnership with The National Urban League and other civil rights organizations are pushing people to registers and make a plan to vote.
WATERLOO, IA - SEPTEMBER 27: Voting booths are set up for early voting at the Black Hawk County Courthouse on September 27, 2012 in Waterloo, Iowa. Early voting starts today in Iowa where in the 2008 election 36 percent of voters cast an early ballot. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Election Day is right around the corner, and September 18 is the first-ever National Black Voter Day.

It's all in an effort to motivate and galvanize black voters in the fight against systemic racism.

BET in partnership with The National Urban League and other civil rights organizations are pushing people to registers and make a plan to vote. 

It's part of BET's nonpartisan voting campaign #ReclaimYourVote. It's also a continuation of the fight against racism ignited by the Black Lives Matters Movement. 

RELATED: Here's how to register to vote in the 2020 election in the Carolinas

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Amid the pandemic, planning ahead to vote is critical, absentee ballots in North Carolina are already being sent out. 

The Black Political Caucus of Charlotte Mecklenburg is also pushing for more voters in the community to submit ballots. They plan to make home visits and make calls. 

Chairman, Attorney Khalif J. Rhodes said it's important to educate yourself not just on presidential candidates but local and state leaders.

"Vote like your life depends on it because it can, you can't sit on your hands and wait and while I am extremely encouraged by what I see right now with folks going out and taking their voices to the streets, I would be elated-- I don't think I could think of a better word, to see people hit the poles," Rhodes said. 

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