CHARLOTTE, N.C. — There are constant warnings to keep you and your children safe during hot summer days, but animal hospitals are reminding everyone to keep pets in mind too.

"It's heartbreaking because the dog doesn't have a voice to say 'It's too hot, my feet are burning,'" said Bobbi Parton, an animal enthusiast.

Bobbi Parton is using her voice to speak up for the animals that can't. She's a lifelong dog lover and can't stand seeing any pet in pain. 

"It's heartbreaking and nobody wants to see that with their pet," Parton said.

Parton posted graphic photos she found online to Facebook. She's seen burnt paw pad cases first-hand.

"They were out walking the family pet. One was a puppy and I guess the girl thought the dog was just fighting her to walk and I stopped her to ask her do you know how the hot the road is?'" said Parton. "At that point her puppy's paws were completely red."

Dr. Jay Hreiz, a veterinarian at the Ebenezer Animal Hospital, hasn't seen a dog with burnt paw pads yet, but it's something his team prepares for and something families should be aware.

"High 70s can equal 125 degrees on the asphalt after about an hour or two," Dr. Hreiz said. "You may come off the asphalt and your dog's paws may be really red, but the blisters won't start than possibly that evening or when you're going to bed."

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