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REPLAY: Vaccine for teens. Answering your questions: Virtual town hall

WCNC Charlotte and a panel of public health experts are answering your questions about the COVID-19 vaccine.

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Join WCNC Charlotte, and our panel of experts from North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services and Novant Health, for a virtual town hall event dedicated to answering your questions about the COVID-19 vaccine for teenagers.

WCNC Charlotte's Fred Shropshire hosts this streaming event with guests Dr. Charlene Wong, Chief Health Policy Officer for COVID-19 at North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services, and Dr. Catherine Ohmstede, a pediatrician with Novant Health Dilworth Pediatrics and physician lead for Novant Health Children’s Health Institute.

Wong and Ohmstede answer your questions about the Pfizer coronavirus vaccine, which is now eligible for patients between the ages of 12 years of age and older.

If you miss the live event, you will be able to watch the event on-demand on wcnc.com, the WCNC Charlotte mobile app, the WCNC Charlotte Roku app, the WCNC Charlotte Fire TV App, and on the WCNC Charlotte YouTube channel.

On Monday, the Food and Drug Administration announced it was expanding emergency use authorization for Pfizer's COVID-19 vaccine to children ages 12-15. 

The agency said the two-dose vaccine has "met the statutory criteria" to allow the EUA to be amended, and says the "known and potential benefits of this vaccine in individuals 12 years of age and older outweigh the known and potential risks."

On Wednesday, the Center for Disease Control endorsed using the Pfizer vaccine on children as young as 12.

Nearly 35% of the U.S. population and 44% of adults have been fully vaccinated as of Monday, according to the CDC. That means people who have received both doses of either the Pfizer or Moderna vaccines or the single-dose Johnson & Johnson vaccine. Forty-six percent of the population and 58.2% have received at least one dose of one of those vaccines.